Faith Without Trust by Ginger Solomon

Ginger picDictionary.com defines faith as “confidence or trust in a person or thing.” But how can you have faith without trust?

I think we’ve all had trust issues at one time or another. At least I have. I’ve doubted people – their motives or their words. And I’ve doubted God. I’ve questioned His love for me. I’ve asked why so many times I can’t even count them.

One thing I have come to understand is that God has always been with me. Even in the darkest moments of my life, and there have been a few, He has been by my side. When I’ve turned away, He has been faithful and remained steadfast in His love for me. No matter how I “feel” or how things seem to be falling apart, God is there.

But even with that knowledge, I have doubts when I’m in the midst of a new trial. I try to place God in a box. The size of which is conceived from what I’ve been taught and the experiences I’ve had, but as Isaiah 55:8 reminds us, “’For My thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways My ways,’ says the Lord.”

We are finite and He is infinite. He won’t fit in my box. Or your box. Ever. He will always be bigger and better than we can imagine.

Cahri, my heroine in One Choice, struggles with trusting God. In the beginning of the book, she wants nothing to do with God, though she continues to attend church so she can keep her job. She is angry and has lost her faith in Him. In her opinion, God no longer deserves her trust. BUT God (don’t you just love that phrase?), in His infinite grace, calls to Cahri even as she’s going through the hardest trial of her life. He speaks to her through art, creation, and through her memories. He won’t leave her alone. Toward the end of the book, Cahri finds herself in a situation that forces her to trust God. She has nothing left, but the small grain of faith that her parents planted in her as a child. A grain of faith that has grown because God is THERE. He is everywhere she looks.

In the end, she must trust God because she, by herself, is helpless. She must trust Him with her very life.

But then, don’t we all do that every day? On some level, we trust God will continue to provide the air we need to breathe. We trust that the muscles and bones He created will provide movement and support. We trust that the cup we pour our drink of choice in to will hold said liquid. We trust that the laws of physics will remain in place, that the chair we sit in will hold us, that our cars will transport us to our destination.

“But without faith it is impossible to please Him, for he who comes to God must believe that He is, and that He is a rewarder of those who diligently seek Him.” (Heb. 11:6 NKJV)

I think many times we believe that God is, but we fail to believe that He rewards those that diligently seek Him. Okay, maybe you don’t, but I do. I know how bad I am, and how much I mess up(aka sin) daily. BUT God (there it is again) is faithful to forgive us and cleanse us from all of the bad stuff (1 John 1:9)

In my novel, God protects Cahri from herself, and from others. He is there for her, even when she doesn’t feel his presence. And, as in any novel I write, she has a happily-ever-after.

He’s there for you, too. Every day. And if you believe in Him, trust in Him, have faith in Him, you will have a happily-ever-after too.

If you have a need that you are comfortable sharing, or even if you don’t share, but just need some prayer, leave a comment and I will pray for you.

One Choice

OneChoice 453x680Cahri Michaels is American by birth, but Belikarian by choice. Being selected to participate the Bridal March forces her to give up the independent life she’s created for herself. She’s not ready to be anyone’s wife, much less to a man she doesn’t know.

Prince Josiah Vallis despises the centuries old tradition—the Bridal March—that is forcing him to choose a wife from fifty women. Why does it matter that he’s twenty-five and still single?

When Cahri and Josiah meet, sparks fly. Will it ignite a godly love that can see them through or will they be burned, never to be the same?

Barnes and Noble

Amazon

Astraea Press

Ginger Solomon is a Christian, a wife, a mother to seven, and a writer — in that order (mostly). When not homeschooling her youngest five, doing laundry or fixing dinner, she writes or reads romance of any genre, some sci-fi/fantasy, and some suspense. She’s a member of American Christian Fiction Writers, president of her local writing group, and writes regularly for three blogs. In addition to all that, she loves animals, horses especially, likes to do needlework (knitting, crocheting, and sometimes cross-stitch), and loves to sing in the choir at church.

Christina here, please don’t forget that I am giving away a copy of The Guardian’s Promise to one commenter. Winner will be announced Sunday, February 9, 2014. U.S and Canadian residents only, please.

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4 thoughts on “Faith Without Trust by Ginger Solomon

  1. This was right on time! I really needed to stumble across this today. I love when God gives us an answer in the most unconventional way. We just have to learn to stop, wait, open our eyes, and just listen. There are some things I have been struggling with lately and I have to keep reminding myself that we cannot do certain things alone. We have to surrender and ask for help. I know who God is and all that he is capable of doing. Where I fall short is thinking I am facing things all alone. And clearly that is not the case. Headed online to Amazon now! 🙂 I love a good read! Especially when it deals with real life issues that are relatable.

    • It is so awesome to see God working through my words. All glory goes to Him. He knew what you needed today, and I’m glad I could be the vessel He used to provide it. 🙂

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